NYC

After Saturday’s full schedule and a day off yesterday to take in some sights and see friends, today is the day I have been waiting for. There was always another motive for making the trip to New York. Not really an ulterior motive, more an essential one, maybe just for me on a personal level I guess. Naturally, meeting the former political prisoners was the major issue in planning any trip, but before committing to coming to New York there was always one person I was waiting on. Today, after over a year of waiting, the day has finally come.

I first wrote to a number of what you might call ‘A-list’ celebrities back in 2009 when this project first got off the ground. I was selective in who I approached both as people I would like to meet because of who they are and in what they do for Burma and Human Rights (George Clooney was one of them and although I never heard back from him it was a nice surprise to see the front cover of the book about his latest film “The American”directed by one of my hero’s Anton Corbijn… a beautiful portrait I’m sure you’ll agree). But it wasn’t until late October 2010, well over a year after my initial approach, that I suddenly received an email from Yoko Ono saying that she would like to be photographed by me for this project. I actually dropped my phone in shock when I read the email. I never once honestly expected anyone I had approached to ever to agree to be in this work, but personally, she was the one person I had really hoped who might just say yes.

Yoko Ono stands in solidarity with Aung San Suu Kyi

Of course there are many reasons why anyone would want to meet Yoko Ono. She is an artist, musician, author, leading peace activist and of course she is John Lennon’s wife. Who really wouldn’t want to sit down and have a cup of tea with her? The chance was simply too good to miss, she was someone who I would die to meet, so we dropped everything when she emailed me last wednesday and here we are now.

We headed down to Greenwich Village, with time for a relaxing coffee in this beautiful part of town before making our way to her gallery where we had arranged to meet. I have to say now that this is not the sort of work I am accustomed to at all – being far more comfortable working in the background out of sight and mind or clandestinely in Burma as is often the case. But despite this I think we managed ok and got a half decent shot, but the photo was really just the icing on the cake – the cake itself was of course just meeting Yoko Ono and talking with her. She is amazing, a wonderful, kind person and I never really doubted she would be. As soon as she walked in to the studio, we were greeted with a broad smile and as soon as she saw Jackie (on seeing she was Burmese) she went straight up to her and threw her arms around her. If it had been appropriate for us to cry tears of joy I think it might have happened. I could never have imagined in my wildest dreams that she might have connected so much to what we are doing and to Burma in general. We chatted, smiled, laughed, took some photos and chatted some more… and more hugs all round of course.

When the time came to leave we made our way outside and said our goodbyes, huge thanks to Karla and everyone for making this happen. But as she drove off into the distance we only then noticed that looking down on us all from high up above was John Lennon, himself. If meeting and photographing Yoko Ono achieves nothing more than providing me with an immense personal moment in my life, then so be it. But at the same time rest assured, she is totally and utterly impassioned with Daw Aung San Suu Kyi, Burma’s political prisoners and the people of Burma as a whole. Her heart and soul are very, very much with you all.

Advertisements